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Asbestos Mold

Asbestos is a naturally occurring substance that has been used extensively because of its heat strength, tensile strength, and insulating properties. It has been used in thousands of products, most notably:

  • Automotive Parts: brake pads, clutches, hood liners, gaskets and valves;
  • Tiles: Flooring, ceiling and roofing tiles were commonly made with asbestos. The adhesive used to lay down flooring tiles has also been a source of exposure
  • Cement: Asbestos-containing cement was used in building materials because the fibers provided strength without adding much weight. Its insulating and fire-resistant properties also made the mineral an ideal substance to add to cement;
  • Construction: adhesives, mastics and gunning mix, ductwork connectors, floor backing, drywall taping compounds, and insulation; and
  • Textiles: Asbestos was used in the production of cloths and garments for its resistance to heat and corrosive elements. Some of the most common textiles included blankets, fireman suits and rope.

There are six types of asbestos: chrysotile, amosite, crocidolite, tremolite, anthophyllite and actinolite.

Chrysotile Asbestos

Approximately 90 percent of the asbestos used commercially in the world is chrysotile. Its fibers are curly and longer than other asbestos types. Supporters of asbestos have argued that chrysotile isn't as toxic as other asbestos types, yet scientific studies confirm that it causes the same diseases and is extremely hazardous to human health.

Approximately 90 percent of the asbestos used commercially in the world is chrysotile. Its fibers are curly and longer than other asbestos types. Supporters of asbestos have argued that chrysotile isn’t as toxic as other asbestos types, yet scientific studies confirm that it causes the same diseases and is extremely hazardous to human health.

Amosite Asbestos

Considered more toxic than chrysotile, amosite asbestos is primarily sourced in South Africa. It often appears brown in color and its fibers are shorter and straighter than chrysotile fibers. Amosite was most commonly used in construction products.

Considered more toxic than chrysotile, amosite asbestos is primarily sourced in South Africa. It often appears brown in color and its fibers are shorter and straighter than chrysotile fibers. Amosite was most commonly used in construction products.

Crocidolite Asbestos

Considered more toxic than chrysotile, amosite asbestos is primarily sourced in South Africa. It often appears brown in color and its fibers are shorter and straighter than chrysotile fibers. Amosite was most commonly used in construction products.

Considered more toxic than chrysotile, amosite asbestos is primarily sourced in South Africa. It often appears brown in color and its fibers are shorter and straighter than chrysotile fibers. Amosite was most commonly used in construction products.

Tremolite Asbestos

This mineral is commonly found alongside deposits of talc, vermiculite and chrysotile. Tremolite contaminated the infamous vermiculite mine in Libby, Mont. Vermiculite from that mine was installed in up to 35 million American homes in the form of Zonolite attic insulation, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

This mineral is commonly found alongside deposits of talc, vermiculite and chrysotile. Tremolite contaminated the infamous vermiculite mine in Libby, Mont. Vermiculite from that mine was installed in up to 35 million American homes in the form of Zonolite attic insulation, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Anthophyllite Asbestos

Anthophyllite deposits are less common than other asbestos deposits. Less of this mineral was used when compared to other forms of asbestos. It was primarily mined in Finland, and some deposits of the mineral were mined in North Carolina and Georgia.

Anthophyllite deposits are less common than other asbestos deposits. Less of this mineral was used when compared to other forms of asbestos. It was primarily mined in Finland, and some deposits of the mineral were mined in North Carolina and Georgia.

Actonolite Asbestos

This mineral has straight-shaped fibers and is normally dark in color. Actinolite was commonly combined with vermiculite to make insulation. It was also used in construction materials such as drywall and paint.

This mineral has straight-shaped fibers and is normally dark in color. Actinolite was commonly combined with vermiculite to make insulation. It was also used in construction materials such as drywall and paint.

According to the World Heath Organization 107,000 people die each year from asbestos-related lung cancer, mesothelioma and asbestosis resulting from occupational exposure. This means that approximately 294 people die daily from asbestos. Every hour 12 people die because of asbestos. One death every 5 minutes! Every day about 125 million people in the world are exposed to asbestos at the workplace, meaning death from asbestos will continue.

In the United States, 15,000 asbestos related deaths occur each year, nearly 2 Americans die each hour. Asbestos is scary because it is lethal and has been described as a silent killer that can lead to asbestosis, mesothelioma, tremolite poisoning, or cancer of the esophagus, colon, or stomach.

If you think that you have found asbestos in your home, don’t touch it. Asbestos is a risk in the home when it is disturbed in a way that produces dust that contains asbestos fibres. In many cases the presence of asbestos-containing materials in the home is no cause for alarm if the material has not been damaged. If the material is not damaged and shows no signs of wear and tear it can often be left in place. For example, internal asbestos cement sheet walls or ceilings that are in good condition and coated with paint do not pose a risk to health, while they are not showing signs of degradation or damage.

It is fundamental that the company you employ to remove asbestos is fully licensed (either as Class A – friable and bonded or Class B – bonded only). Request the Asbestos Licence Number and contact WorkSafe to ensure that the company is allowed to remove asbestos from your property. Failure to ensure that a licensed contractor is carrying out work may result in both the company and yourself, as the property owner, being fined.

http://www.asbestosmoldct.com/asbestos-facts-and-information/

http://www.asbestoswise.com.au/information-and-resources/asbestos-removal-and-safe-handling/

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